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Stories of Brethren stewards * April 5, 2017


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Photo by Matt DeBall

Can these bones live?
By Matt DeBall, coordinator of Donor Communications

“The hand of the LORD came upon me, and… set me down in the middle of a valley; it was full of bones.... [God] said to me, ‘Mortal, can these bones live?’ I answered, ‘O Lord GOD, you know.’ Then [God] said to me, ‘Prophesy to these bones, and say to them: O dry bones, hear the word of the LORD.… I will cause breath to enter you, and you shall live’” (Ezekiel 37:1-5).

Nothing reveals death and destruction more clearly than a large heap of bones. For Ezekiel, this vision represented the destruction of his beloved people—the destruction of God’s chosen nation. Ezekiel must have been horrified and full of despair as he surveyed this valley of death.
flowers
The resurrection power of
God still works today
.”
Photo by Cheryl Brumbaugh-Cayford


Though our circumstances may not be as dire as Ezekiel’s vision, they can sometimes feel very similar. Even without intentionally searching, it’s easy to find decay in our world—in the brutal destruction of human life, in the ever-widening chasm of animosity between opposing groups, and, in general, in the diminishing focus to care for all people. If God asked us if broken forms could be restored, our words might mimic those of Ezekiel—whether of despair (“O Lord, [only] you know [if it’s possible]”) or even disgust (“O Lord, [surely] you know [it isn’t possible]”). What reason could we have to respond differently?

Thankfully, the God who asks the question is also the God who answers it. In Ezekiel’s vision, God instructed him to prophesy to the bones, and in response, God breathed new life into them and regenerated those broken bodies. This was a promise of restoration for Israel, but was it just a vision or a metaphor? Surely such things don’t happen in real life.

As we approach Easter, we remember that God does more than tell wonderful stories. We remember Jesus, the Savior, who became a lifeless bag of bones but did not stay that way. Though the conditions of nature declare that dry bones cannot be re-animated, the Creator and Redeemer of all life is not bound by these principles. What was only a shadow of hope in the vision of Ezekiel is fully realized in the resurrection of Jesus. And what God has done once, God can surely do again.

The resurrection power of God still works today. The new life of Jesus is the new life that we experience in following him. The resurrected body of Jesus is represented each year in the new life of plants and flowers. Though we may not see renewal in all areas and realms of life, God invites us to speak to any pile of bones, declaring God’s promise for restoration.

May we have the courage to accept God’s promise for restoration and declare it to a world full of death and decay. May God once again breathe new life into dry bones.

Learn more about the work of the Church of the Brethren at www.brethren.org or make an Easter gift to the ministries that you love at www.brethren.org/give .
 



Inspiration 2017 Generations NOAC logo

www.brethren.org/noac



Inspiration 2017


“One generation commends
your works to another;

they tell of your mighty acts”
(Psalm 145:4).


National Older
Adult Conference
September 4-8
Lake Junaluska, N.C.


Register today at
www.brethren.org/noac

 


“Out of the deepest despair and the darkness of death, you bring new life and light and hope. May we be bearers of your life and light in the world, so that others may see your life in us, and know that you love them, that we love them and we pray for them.”

—A prayer based on John 3:16 by Lisa Krieg,
written for Easter Sunday. Find this and other resources on the Anabaptist Worship Exchange
at www.anabaptistworshipexchange.org.

 

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Donor Relations department photo 2Matt DeBall, John Hipps, Mark Flory Steury,
Cherise Glunz, and Traci Rabenstein.

Watch for our
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April 19
.

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